Focus on exercise: The most compelling studies favor physical activity for mental acuity, says Gary W. Small, M.D., the director of the UCLA Longevity Center and a coauthor of The Alzheimer’s Prevention Program ($14, amazon.com). A study from the Annals of Internal Medicine found that people who were fitter at midlife had a 36 percent lower risk of developing dementia later in life than did their less-fit peers. “When people exercise, the areas that control memory, thinking, and attention increase in the brain,” says Small. “Regular exercisers also have less of the abnormal protein deposits in the brain that have been linked to Alzheimer’s.” That’s not to say that diet has no impact, says Small: “It’s just that the effects of exercise are more pronounced based on the evidence we have now.” Foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids (such as fish, nuts, and flaxseed) and antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables (like strawberries and spinach) have been shown to improve brain health, while refined sugars and processed foods can have the opposite effect.
Focus on exercise: According to an eight-year study published in the journal Circulation, women who were the most physically fit were the least likely to die from any cause, including cardiovascular disease, the number one killer of women in the United States. “Being fit is more important than weight or body mass index for heart health,” says Martha Gulati, M.D., the lead author of the study and an associate professor of medicine at Ohio State University in Columbus. In addition to helping you stay trim, exercise alleviates stress, lowers cholesterol, and increases blood flow. The three of them combined improve heart health more than diet alone does.

One short study among people eating shitake mushrooms daily for four weeks found that they helped lower body-wide inflammation and boosted immune functioning. Other species are being studied for their potential to fight cancer, high cholesterol, diabetes and obesity. In addition to salads, omelets, and stir-fries, consider blending mushrooms with ground beef or turkey to cut back on meat and add more plant-based goodness. Or maybe you’d like to nosh on mushroom jerky, a cool new snack that hit the shelves this year.
There's nothing fun about chafing. You can get the rash (caused by moisture and constant friction) on your thighs, around your sports bra, and even under your arms, to name a few hot spots! To prevent the next occurrence, try rubbing on an anti-chafe stick like Bodyglide For Her Anti-Chafing Stick ($9; amazon.com)in any spots that have the potential to chafe. Moisture-wicking fabrics help, too, so if you have a few quick-dry shirts (Nike, Asics, and Under Armour all make 'em), save those for your long runs or tough workouts, when chafing is most likely to occur.
Vitamin C is needed to form collagen in bones, cartilage, muscle, and blood vessels, and aids in the absorption of iron. Vitamin C deficiency was discovered in sailors more than 200 years ago. This deficiency, later called scurvy, was killing sailors who stayed out on the sea for long voyages. Initial symptoms of scurvy in adults may include loss of appetite, diarrhea, shortness of breath, weakness, and fever, followed by irritability, depression, leg pain, pseudoparalysis, swelling over long bones of the body, anemia, paleness, poor wound healing, corkscrew hair, dry eyes, skin thickening (hyperkeratosis), and bleeding (particularly gum bleeding, bleeding behind the eyes causing prominence, bleeding at the joints of the ribs and sternum causing discoloration under the skin of the chest, skin bruising, or blood in the urine or stool). Scurvy can now be prevented with an adequate diet. Dietary sources of vitamin C include fruits and vegetables, particularly citrus fruits such as oranges, limes, and lemons.
Physicians of ancient Greece treated diseases, including epilepsy, by altering their patients' diet. An early treatise in the Hippocratic Corpus, On the Sacred Disease, covers the disease; it dates from c. 400 BC. Its author argued against the prevailing view that epilepsy was supernatural in origin and cure, and proposed that dietary therapy had a rational and physical basis.[Note 3] In the same collection, the author of Epidemics describes the case of a man whose epilepsy is cured as quickly as it had appeared, through complete abstinence of food and drink.[Note 4] The royal physician Erasistratus declared, "One inclining to epilepsy should be made to fast without mercy and be put on short rations."[Note 5] Galen believed an "attenuating diet"[Note 6] might afford a cure in mild cases and be helpful in others.[11]
In recent years, many specialized diets have gained popularity among some people with arthritis. To date, few of these claims have been substantiated by rigorously controlled studies. That said, some people find that certain foods trigger changes in symptoms –– either for the better or the worse. If you find yourself noticing this type of pattern, try keeping a food diary for a few weeks to test if indeed what you eat makes a difference or if you have food sensitivities.
Note: Are you a vegetarian or vegan and want to go on a ketogenic diet? It’s still possible! Just keep in mind that the dietary restrictions can sometimes be a little bit intense. Make sure to plan ahead and prepare to aid your success. To help out, we’ve published articles (with 7 day meal plans included) for both the vegetarian ketogenic diet and the vegan ketogenic diet.
These types of back-and-forth weight fluctuations can contribute to disordered eating, Kizer says, or can worsen an already unhealthy relationship with food. “I think this diet appeals to people who have issues with portion control and with binge eating,” she says. "And in many cases, what they really need is a lifestyle coach or a professional counselor to help them get to the bottom of those issues."
The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that in medicine is used primarily to treat difficult-to-control (refractory) epilepsy in children. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fueling brain function. However, if little carbohydrate remains in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the frequency of epileptic seizures.[1] Around half of children and young people with epilepsy who have tried some form of this diet saw the number of seizures drop by at least half, and the effect persists even after discontinuing the diet.[2] Some evidence indicates that adults with epilepsy may benefit from the diet, and that a less strict regimen, such as a modified Atkins diet, is similarly effective.[1] Potential side effects may include constipation, high cholesterol, growth slowing, acidosis, and kidney stones.[3]

One of the keys to weight loss and a healthy lifestyle is understanding what to eat. Nutrition can be confusing, but it doesn't have to be! Get easy nutrition tips, learn facts about nutrition, read nutrition blogs, browse healthy recipes or watch recipe videos. Discover how to dine out on a diet, and learn healthy eating strategies. Find out more about eating gluten-free or vegetarian, or increase your knowledge of fiber and protein.
Following a healthy diet can be as simple as following the guidelines, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, that is. These guidelines have been updated and released every five years since 1980 by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Department of Agriculture (USDA). The goal of these guidelines is to promote health and reduce the risk for major chronic disease for people 2 years and older. The Guidelines also address ways to maintain a healthy weight.
“The first step is to change your mindset, and mentally decide that you are a healthy person,” Mangieri encourages. “But it’s never just one lifestyle change! Make sure every part of your life proves it. Eat nourishing foods and drink plenty of water. Get out and move and build strength. And don’t forget to sleep and de-stress. One good decision supports another.” But also, if you really don’t know where to start with a healthy diet for weight loss, talk to a registered dietitian. That could ultimately be money much better spent than on a personal trainer.  

The ketogenic diet achieved national media exposure in the US in October 1994, when NBC's Dateline television programme reported the case of Charlie Abrahams, son of Hollywood producer Jim Abrahams. The two-year-old suffered from epilepsy that had remained uncontrolled by mainstream and alternative therapies. Abrahams discovered a reference to the ketogenic diet in an epilepsy guide for parents and brought Charlie to John M. Freeman at Johns Hopkins Hospital, which had continued to offer the therapy. Under the diet, Charlie's epilepsy was rapidly controlled and his developmental progress resumed. This inspired Abrahams to create the Charlie Foundation to promote the diet and fund research.[10] A multicentre prospective study began in 1994, the results were presented to the American Epilepsy Society in 1996 and were published[17] in 1998. There followed an explosion of scientific interest in the diet. In 1997, Abrahams produced a TV movie, ...First Do No Harm, starring Meryl Streep, in which a young boy's intractable epilepsy is successfully treated by the ketogenic diet.[1]


“Don't like eating meat?” asks Ginger Hultin, RDN, a dietitian in private practice in Seattle and a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “Then don't be paleo! Travel a lot and rely on eating out? The DASH diet may end in frustration for you.” The bottom line: The diet you choose needs to be safe and effective, while taking into account your lifestyle.
×