In spring of 2015, an abstract was published of preliminary results from a clinical trial in France involving 154 people with primary-progressive MS or secondary-progressive MS. They were given high-dose biotin (MD1003) or inactive placebo for 48 weeks. The results suggested that 12.6% of those given MD1003 showed improvement in disability (using either the EDSS scale that measures disability progression, or improvement in a timed walk), versus none of those on placebo, and there were no serious safety issues reported.
Vitamin B12: Like folate, vitamin B12 is needed for producing and maintaining new cells. It is also needed to maintain the sheaths that surround and protect nerve fibers. An inadequate amount of B12 causes pernicious anemia. Signs of vitamin B12 deficiency are fatigue, weakness, constipation, loss of appetite, weight loss, and numbness and tingling in the hands and feet. An excess intake of folate can mask the symptoms of B12 deficiency, so it's important to have your levels checked by a blood test, especially if you consume a vegetarian diet. Vitamin B12 is found in animal products like trout, salmon, beef, and dairy foods. There are fortified cereals that provide B12 as well. Doctors do not routinely check vitamin B12 levels.
There's no denying it: Getting the fresh air from exercising outdoors is great! But along with it, you also get the harmful UV rays. To keep yourself shielded while still having fun in the sun, opt for a sweat-proof screen with SPF 30 or higher (look out for types that say "water-resistant" or "waterproof" on the bottle, terms regulated by the FDA), a lip balm with SPF 15 or higher, a lightweight hat, and sports shades. Also consider trading in your white tee and instead going for a shirt with built-in UV protection (a rating of 30 UVP is necessary to be awarded the Skin Cancer Foundation's "Seal of Recommendation"; a white T-shirt has a rating of 10). And remember, the rays are at their brightest from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., so try to plan a before-or post-work sweat-session.
You should aim to score your carbs from high-fiber, water-rich fruits and vegetables to naturally boost hydration and keep your digestive system humming along. Unsure of whether a produce pick is low in carbs? Reach for options grown above the ground (leafy greens, peppers, and stalk-shaped vegetables), rather than below ground (root veggies like potatoes, carrots, and parsnips), as they typically offer fewer carbs.
Take action: Aerobic exercise has always been regarded as critical to improving brain health, but strength training is also key. In fact, the two modes of exercise benefit the brain differently, which is why it’s best to do both. In a 2013 study published in the Journal of Aging Research, the authors found that both cardio exercise and strength training improved spatial memory (for example, remembering where objects were placed in a room) in women ages 70 to 80. Cardio alone improved verbal memory (for example, being able to remember a list of words after a distraction). And in a 2012 study from the Archives of Internal Medicine, women in their 70s who strength-trained improved their associative memory, meaning that they remembered pairs of pictures that they had been shown earlier. This is the kind of memory that allows you to remember two pieces of information at once, like picturing not just your keys but also where you placed them.
Fiber aids digestion, prevents constipation, and lowers cholesterol -- and can help with weight loss. Most Americans get only half the fiber they need. To reap fiber's benefits, most women should get about 25 grams daily, while men need about 38 grams -- or 14 grams per 1,000 calories. Good fiber sources include oatmeal, beans, whole grain foods, nuts, and most fruits and vegetables.
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