Vitamin B12: Like folate, vitamin B12 is needed for producing and maintaining new cells. It is also needed to maintain the sheaths that surround and protect nerve fibers. An inadequate amount of B12 causes pernicious anemia. Signs of vitamin B12 deficiency are fatigue, weakness, constipation, loss of appetite, weight loss, and numbness and tingling in the hands and feet. An excess intake of folate can mask the symptoms of B12 deficiency, so it's important to have your levels checked by a blood test, especially if you consume a vegetarian diet. Vitamin B12 is found in animal products like trout, salmon, beef, and dairy foods. There are fortified cereals that provide B12 as well. Doctors do not routinely check vitamin B12 levels.
Vitamin A is abundant in our food supply, so there is little risk of a deficiency. It is needed for regulation of the immune system, vision, reproduction, bone growth, cell division, and cell differentiation. A deficiency will result in night blindness and a decreased immune system, resulting in a decrease in the ability to fight infections. This can occur from an inadequate diet, chronic diarrhea, and an excess intake of alcohol. Dietary sources of vitamin A include

The emergence of low-carbohydrate diets has resulted in confusion over whether carbohydrates are good or bad. Carbohydrates are one of the six essential nutrients. This means that they are essential for your health, so there is no way that omitting them from your diet would be beneficial. An excess intake of any nutrient will cause weight gain. The key is to consume the appropriate sources and amounts of carbohydrates.


Implementing the diet can present difficulties for caregivers and the patient due to the time commitment involved in measuring and planning meals. Since any unplanned eating can potentially break the nutritional balance required, some people find the discipline needed to maintain the diet challenging and unpleasant. Some people terminate the diet or switch to a less demanding diet, like the modified Atkins diet or the low-glycaemic index treatment diet, because they find the difficulties too great.[42]

Fruits and vegetables contain large amounts of cancer-fighting and inflammation-reducing substances like vitamins, polyphenols, antioxidants, minerals and natural fiber. Most men and women do not consume the recommended daily intake of fruits and vegetables. If you are working to change the way you eat, aim to make manageable changes. Try to include a variety of fruits and vegetables in your diet.
Having ready-to-eat snacks and meals-in-minutes on hand sets you up for success. You'll be less likely to hit the drive-through or order a pizza if you can throw together a healthy meal in five or 10 minutes. Here are some essentials to keep on hand: frozen vegetables, whole-grain pasta, reduced-fat cheese, canned tomatoes, canned beans, pre-cooked grilled chicken breast, whole grain tortillas or pitas, and bags of salad greens.
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