“There are a million reasons why dieters fail, and the reasons vary from one person to the next,” explains Somer. “People lie about what they are eating, underestimating their calorie intake by about 700 to 800 calories a day.” Exercise is also grossly misinterpreted by a lot of dieters. “They think/say they exercise far more than they really do,” Somer elaborates.
The interesting thing is that many people are willing to spend a lot of time, money, and energy on expensive gym memberships and boutique fitness classes—and then say they’re too busy to cook. Even if you only spend 15 minutes driving to and from the gym every day, that’s 30 minutes that you could have put toward cooking a healthy dinner. And if you spend $30 a pop, 3 times per week on fancy circuit or spin classes, that’s $90 you could dedicate to your grocery budget. That wild salmon doesn’t sound quite so outrageous now, right?
The group that exercised and changed its diet at the same time showed the greatest improvements in cognitive tests after six months. They improved their test scores by nine years, to resemble those of people 84 years old. The control group showed a continued decline in their brain test scores, and the researchers did not see a significant benefit from either exercise or change in diet alone.

It seems like an easy diet win: Skip breakfast and you'll lose weight. Yet many studies show the opposite can be true. Not eating breakfast can make you hungry later, leading to too much nibbling and binge eating at lunch and dinner. To lose weight -- and keep it off -- always make time for a healthy morning meal, like high-fiber cereal, low-fat milk, and fruit.
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